Strange but True. Motivational
Accountability is a Thing.

June 10, 2016

Motivation is an inside job and so is Accountability. So, what happens when the two are put together? 

 

You feel inspired to achieve!

 

Wouldn’t it be great if all team members were inspired to achieve? That you knew you could count on each to do what they say they are going to do?  The workplace might feel a bit different, maybe a lot different.

 

Let’s take it out of the workplace for an example.

 

Just last weekend a neighbor asked Audrey, my recently driving 16 year old, if she was up to a challenge.  He would give her a crisp $100 bill if she didn’t get a ticket in her first year behind the wheel. But, she would have to give him $100 if she got a ticket.  Her comment, ”What, you want me to be personally accountable?” That’s exactly what she said and she’s still thinking about the offer!

 

Well, yes I do want her to be personally accountable for the responsibilities that go along with safe driving. It’s appearing that the $100 isn’t motivation for her to commit.

 

No surprise.

 

It’s from the outside and for motivation to be effective is must be from within.  Only Audrey can do that for herself.

 

This is what too often happens in the workplace. You know team members know what to do, they tell you they are going to do it, they might even have the best of intentions to try and do it…. and ‘it’ doesn’t happen.  Something was lacking, including the motivation.

 

Taking personal accountability to achieve desired results seems simple, yet so much can get in the way.

It usually stems from lack.  First there is a lack of understanding that accountability can be positive.  Second there is too often: lack of information, lack of clarity, or lack of understanding.  Third, there’s a lack of feedback and celebration.  Removing all these accountability road blocks opens the door for motivation and accountability to spring forth.

 

Yet, motivational accountability doesn’t happen in a vacuum.  There are external workplace variables and internal aspects that are both important. The good news is that there is a process to set yourself up for success.

 

Doing your best. Feeling good about what you do. Knowing you do what you say you are going to do.  Others knowing they can count on you, too. This just feels good no matter your age or focus. You, your team and your organization all massively benefit.

 

As for Audrey and that $100 challenge.  I think she’s good for it.  She has a track record of doing her best and feeling good about herself when she does.

 

 

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Featured Posts

4 Sure-fire Steps to
Motivational Accountability.

December 9, 2016

1/3
Please reload

Archive
Please reload

Follow Me
  • Grey Facebook Icon
  • Grey Twitter Icon
  • Grey Instagram Icon
  • Grey Pinterest Icon
  • White Facebook Icon
  • LinkedIn - White Circle
  • White Pinterest Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

ABOUT TERRI NORVELL

Terri Norvell is a trust teacher. A magnetic motivator. A strategic sherpa. And an all-around good person. She works with leaders to cultivate an inner trust mindset to help them live a life of clarity, confidence, freedom, and joy. 

ABOUT INNER PRIZE

WHAT IS THE INNER PRIZE?

CONNECT

MEET TERRI

CONTACT US

© 2017 Terri Norvell. Website by Double Dutch Creative.